"The Wavy waters in the picture are symbolic of Karma; and lotus, of Bhakti; and the rising-sun, of Jnana. The encircling serpent is indicative of Yoga and the awakened Kundalini Shakti, while the swan in the picture stands for the Paramatman (Supreme Self). Therefore the idea of the picture is that by the union of Karma, Jnana, Bhakti, and Yoga, the vision of the Paramatman is obtained."
–Swami Vivekananda

It is the synthesis of Yogas that Swami Vivekananda regarded as the ideal of Ramakrishna Math and Ramakrishna Mission.

 

LEARN MORE 

Dublin Éire Vedanta Society​

 

Éire Vedanta Society (Ramakrishna Vedanta Centre), Dublin in Ireland is a branch of the Ramakrishna Order of India, worldwide spiritual and welfare organization. Like the other branches in Asia-Oceania, North & South America, Europe and Africa, the Centre in Dublin is a well-known Charity, a self-sustaining unit that looks to the Ramakrishna Order of Monks for spiritual guidance.

 

The Centre bases its teachings on the System of Vedanta, which combines both the religion and philosophy of the Hindus, especially as propounded and practised by Sri Ramakrishna Paramahansa (1836-1886), his spiritual consort and companion Holy Mother Sri Sarada Devi (1853-1920) and his chief disciple Swami Vivekananda (1863-1902).

 

Vedanta teaches that every soul is potentially divine and that its divinity may be manifested through worship, contemplation, unselfish work, and philosophical discrimination. According to Vedanta, Truth is universal and all humankind and all existence are one. It preaches the unity of the Godhead, or ultimate Reality, and accepts every faith as a valid means for its own followers to realise the Truth.

 

The Dublin branch of the world-wide Ramakrishna Math of Belur Math, India maintains at the "Nivedita House" a Ramakrishna Shrine, a Monastery, a small Library, a Book Sale and conducts regular Classes & Lectures, spiritual counselling, Retreats and Music and Yoga lessons. 

Éire Vedanta Society is a registered charity, with charity registration number 20203638 assigned by Charities Regulator and its CHY number is 22389.  It welcomes donations in running the Society for the individual's liberation and the good of the world. You may make it by doing a bank transfer or by cheque.

Donation

BANK TRANSFER:

Account Name :  
Eire Vedanta Society
Bank:  
Bank of Ireland
Blanchardstown, Dublin 15
IBAN: 
IE16BOFI90042054403956
BIC:   BOFIIE2D
Account No: 54403956
Sort Code: 900420

In short, the ideal of the Ramakrishna Order is to strive for inner perfection through God-realization and at the same time to work for the good of the world.

The aim of the monastic Order is to practice and preach the Eternal Religion (Sanatana Dharma), as embodied in the lives and teachings of Sri Ramakrishna, Sri Sarada Devi, and Swami Vivekananda.

The motto of the Ramakrishna Order is Renunciation and Service, and the Harmony of Religions.

The method is Work as Worship.

The activities of the Order are ritualistic worship, meditation and spiritual instruction; training of monastics; propagation of ethical, spiritual and cultural values through preaching and publication of books and magazines; providing general and technical education built on an ethical and spiritual foundation; running medical services, schools, hostels, orphanages etc; relief and rehabilitation during natural calamities; integrated rural development and welfare programs; and religio-cultural activities and many more.

The Gitâ says that there are three kinds of charity: the Tâmasic, the Râjasic and the Sâttvic. Tamasic charity is performed on an impulse. It is always making mistakes.
The doer thinks of nothing but his own impulse to be kind. Rajasic charity is what a man does for his own glory.
And Sattvic charity is that which is given to the right person, in the right way, and at the proper time.


–Swami Vivekananda

Get social with us!
  • Facebook Social Icon
  • Twitter Social Icon
  • YouTube Social  Icon
Share your thoughts!
​Tel: ​+353 89 456 5917
Email : info@rkmireland.org
​​​© 2019 by Ramakrishna Vedanta Centre, Dublin